Back to Victoria: Lighthouse Brewing

CANOE IPA

CANOE IPA

I have no idea how I managed to write an entire post about a brewpub and not include at least one photo of their beer, but somehow I did accomplish that feat yesterday when writing about CANOE Brewpub. So here’s a photo of their IPA. The 1-litre container behind it — sometimes called a “Boston round”, a “growlita” or a “growlette” — is actually filled with water, not beer. As you can also see, there were no large sea otters lounging about in the background, at least while I had my camera ready.

After lunch, we decided to head over to Lighthouse Brewing. Specifically I wanted to catch up with fellow graduate Matt Lyons, who had just moved out to Victoria after a year at Trafalgar Brewing of Oakville, Ontario. I was interested to see what he thought of life on the West Coast.

Lighthouse is a 17-year veteran of the BC craft beer scene, founded by brewer Paul Hoyne (brother of Sean Hoyne of Hoyne Brewing). Paul started with a single beer, kegged for sales to restaurants and bars, and quickly expanded to four canned products. Now Lighthouse is a major player in the BC craft beer market and regularly brews eleven mainstays as well as a number of seasonals.

Lighthouse Brewing

Not built for beauty, but man, they make good beer.

However, unlike nearby Vancouver Island Brewing, a popular draw with tourists, Lighthouse isn’t built for visitors. Housed in an anonymous industrial building down an obscure alley, Lighthouse is never going to win the prize for most beautiful brewery. But they brew a lot of good beer.

Brewhouse

Lighthouse three-vessel brewhouse

Matt was kind enough during a busy day to take us on a tour of Lighthouse, starting with their 25-hL brewhouse. This is a 3-vessel brewhouse: a combined mash/lauter tun, a kettle and a separate whirlpool. This allows the brewers to make more batches — instead of having to leave the wort in the kettle at the end of the boil in order to whirlpool it (to remove coagulated proteins and hop residue), the brewer can move the wort into the whirlpool vessel, move a fresh batch of wort into the now-empty kettle and save 25 minutes of brewing time. Twenty-five minutes may not seem like a lot, but if you are brewing around the clock, that will allow you to brew several more batches of beer every day. And more beer means more money.

Fermentors

Matt Lyons in front of 100-hectolitre monster fermentors

And if you’re going to be brewing more beer, you need fermentors — lots and lots of fermentors. And Matt showed us lots of fermentors, including roomfuls of 25-hectolitre vessels (each holding a single batch) and several quad-batch monsters capable of holding 100 hectolitres.

Where there are many fermentors, there’s also lots of cleaning — well, that’s the life of a brewer. Kids, don’t become a brewer if you complain about washing the dishes.

And what are you going to do with all that beer when it’s ready? You’d better have a quick way of bottling or canning a lot of beer every day.Yes, Matt showed us the packaging lines, including a rotary filler for bottles.

bottling line

Rotary bottle filler

A rotary filler is a neat piece of equipment: empty bottles arrive on a conveyor belt, enter the large wheel, are filled and capped as they make make one revolution and then are shunted down another conveyor belt to be cartoned. Like I said, neat. A lot of moving parts though — I have heard them called an instrument of the Dark Lord by other brewers.

We also saw canning lines, stacks of pallets of cans, cartons of hops — this place is set up to make and package beer.

As a postscript, in the time since we visited, Matt has been given the opportunity to develop new recipes for Lighthouse, and one of his beers won a medal at this year’s British Columbia Brewing Awards.

Go, Matt!

 

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